Project WIMH: Post #1

Back at it again. It’s been a while since I’ve had an opportunity to move this project forward on the empirical side.

To help with this process, I’ve decided to begin blogging my efforts towards completing Project Work Injury and Mental Health (WIMH).

Over the last semester I finally wrapped up the database search, which consisted of a ludicrous amount of screening (~23,000 articles!).

I also had the great opportunity to present some of the preliminary findings at SIOP 2019 in a symposium on mental health at the workplace. I’m very grateful to Dr. Jennifer Dimoff and her PhD student, Stefanie Fox, for organizing the symposium.

Now that I’ve screened all the articles from the database search, it’s time to vet through the articles I pulled. Usually you have to be pretty intellectually ruthless with this process, but sometimes you can’t help spending too much time on interesting articles.

For instance…

…Betters (2010) found that individuals who were injured at work were more likely to gain weight if they thought they would benefit from mental health services (albeit, no effect size was provided), hinting that the pressure to reduce the discprepancy between where they are physically with where they want to be is having psychological consequences.

…Blake and colleagues (2014) found that over close to 50% of individuals who witness work-related fatalities experience probable or sub-threshold PTSD symptoms, which in turn have striking effects on depression, life functioning, and well-being. This research highlights the importance of psychological interventions for dealing with traumatic events at work.

Anyways, back to being ruthless for a bit as I vet through the pulled articles!

References

Betters, C. J. (2010). Weight gain and work comp: A growing problem in the workers’ compensation rehabilitation system. Work, 37(1), 23-27. doi:10.3233/WOR-2010-1053

Blake, R. A., Lating, J. M., Sherman, M. F., & Kirkhart, M. W. (2014). Probable PTSD and Impairment in Witnesses of Work-Related Fatalities. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 19(2), 189-195. doi:10.1080/15325024.2013.775889

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