Author Archives: Steve Granger

About Steve Granger

I’m currently a PhD candidate in Organizational Behaviour at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. My research primarily focuses on occupational health psychology. In particular, I’m interested in studying mental health & safety (e.g., the experience and consequences of workplace injury), leadership & followership (e.g., social support and interpersonal knowledge as resources), and proactivity & resilience (e.g., predicting the anticipation and adaptation to adversity). When I am not working on research or teaching, I can typically be found reading a book, riding my bike, or spending time with my dog.

Bicycle helmets

Do they matter?

The answer is an overwhelming yes.

Here are just a few numbers from a meta-analysis (i.e., a summary of all existing quantitative research) by Oliver & Creighton (2017) assessing the effectiveness of bicycle helmets in crashes and falls:

51% less likely to experience a head injury
69% less likely to experience a serious head injury
33% less likely to experience a facial injury
And 65% less likely to experience a fatal injury

To boot, other meta-analyses find relatively similar results (Attewell et al., 2001; Elvik, 2011; Høye, 2018).

So yes, bicycle helmets matter.

But recent innovations in bicycle helmet tech have improved their effectiveness a considerable amount.

Here I’m talking about WAVECEL and MIPS (Multi-Directional Impact Protection System).

While these two helmet technologies work in slightly different ways, they essentially soften the impact on the head by separating the helmet and your head from the initial shock.

With a traditional helmet, there is essentially a plastic and foam barrier between your head and what it hits, but your head rotates with the helmet at the same speed (and it’s this initial rotation and acceleration that leads to most head injuries, such as concussions and traumatic brain injuries).

With MIPS and WAVECEL, there is within the helmet a moving liner or collapsible structure, respectively, that decreases this rotation, and ultimately the chance of head injuries (Bliven et al., 2019).

So if you’re in the market for a helmet, I would highly recommend looking out for either MIPS or WAVECEL, with MIPS helmets tending to come in at slightly lower costs because the tech has been around for quite a bit longer.

If you’d like more information about bicycle helmet testing, check out the website for Virginia Tech’s helmet testing lab. They run comprehensive third-party testing on helmets for various sports, including cycling.

References

Attewell, R. G., Glase, K., & McFadden, M. (2001). Bicycle helmet efficacy: a meta-analysis. Accident Analysis & Prevention33(3), 345-352.Chicago

Bliven, E., Rouhier, A., Tsai, S., Willinger, R., Bourdet, N., Deck, C., … & Bottlang, M. (2019). Evaluation of a novel bicycle helmet concept in oblique impact testing. Accident Analysis & Prevention124, 58-65.

Elvik, R. (2011). Publication bias and time-trend bias in meta-analysis of bicycle helmet efficacy: a re-analysis of Attewell, Glase and McFadden, 2001. Accident Analysis & Prevention43(3), 1245-1251.

Høye, A. (2018). Bicycle helmets–To wear or not to wear? A meta-analyses of the effects of bicycle helmets on injuries. Accident Analysis & Prevention117, 85-97.

Olivier, J., & Creighton, P. (2017). Bicycle injuries and helmet use: a systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Epidemiology46(1), 278-292.Chicago

Two wish list destinations, one (110km) ride

This summer I wanted to find the cycling path to and visit Chestermere, as well as visit and ride through Fish Creek provinicial park in southern Calgary. I never thought I’d do this in a single ride, but that’s what ends up happening when you get slightly lost. Besides, it’s never really getting lost or going in the wrong direction when you’re on a bike, it’s called exploration. Kudos to my buddy Kevin for the company and hammering through. Ride on.

First ride in the mountains

Had the wonderful opportunity to ride out in Kananaskis Country on a highway that is closed to cars for half of the year (how awesome is that?!). Apparently Highwood Pass is the highest paved road in Canada at 2206 meters. Definitely one of my favourite rides so far. Shout out to my buddy Vaarun for letting me know about this and inviting me out. Ride on!

Project WIMH: Post #5

To what extent could mental health explain the underreporting of work injuries?

A study by Zadow and colleagues (2017) examined whether emotional exhaustion, a core aspect of burnout and a common sign of mental health problems, predicted both reported and unreported injuries among hospital personnel.

They found that reported injuries were not statistically related to emotional exhaustion but unreported injuries were – and the difference between the correlational effect sizes (size of the standardized statistical relationship between injuries and emotional exhaustion) was fairly large (.11 to .30).

Too spent to go through the rigmarole of reporting injuries? Quite possibly.

References

Zadow, A. J., Dollard, M. F., McLinton, S. S., Lawrence, P., & Tuckey, M. R. (2017). Psychosocial safety climate, emotional exhaustion, and work injuries in healthcare workplaces. Stress Health. doi:10.1002/smi.2740

Project WIMH: Post #4

Almost done vetting the large folder of articles I pulled from the databases!

Came across an interesting paper by Simo Salminen and colleagues (2014) about whether stress captured by a single item (“Stress refers to a situation where a person feels tense, restless, nervous, or anxious, or is unable to sleep at night because his/her mind is troubled all the time. Do you feel that kind of stress these days?” p. 2) was associated with the risk of severe injury 8 years later.

Considering the paper was published, you can bet it does!

In fact, they found that individuals who rated their stress as high compared to those who rated it as low were roughly 42% more likely to experience a severe injury at the 8-year follow-up.

Oh, and this finding also controlled for age, gender, marital status, occupational status, education, and physical work environment.

However, greater clarity was gained when they broke down the overall sample by gender and occupation. Turns out that the association of this stress item with later severe injuries was only significant within males and individuals in blue-collar occupations (i.e., high stressed blue-collar males were more likely to experience a severe injury than their low stressed blue-collar male counterparts).

Goes to show that the bigger picture findings can sometimes mask what’s actually happening.

References

Salminen, S., Kouvonen, A., Koskinen, A., Joensuu, M., & Väänänen, A. (2014). Is a single item stress measure independently associated with subsequent severe injury: A prospective cohort study of 16,385 forest industry employees. BMC Public Health, 14(543), 1-7. 

First ride out to Bragg Creek of 2019

Had the opportunity (and legs) to make it to one of my favourite cycling destinations within range from Calgary: Bragg Creek. Legs were feeling good today and managed to power through despite a nasty headwind on the way there (convincing myself how so very sweet it would be on the way back helped!). Ride on!

Project WIHM: Post #3

The persistence of post-traumatic stress symptoms following an injury is pernicious.

Haagsma and colleagues (2010) followed up with a general population of patients 2 years after treatment for an injury.

Post-traumatic stress symptoms among these patients were negatively associated with almost all the functional and health-related quality of life measures in the study (e.g., problems with mobility, emotion, cognition, as well as considerably higher levels of pain, discomfort, anxiety & depression).

One take away from this study is the emphasis surrounding the treatment of physical AND psychological symptoms following an injury. If the psychological aspects of traumatic injuries are not rehabilitated in tandum with the physical aspects of injuries, there could be serious long-term consequences towards functioning and quality of life.

This is said in light of the study design limitations. Most importantly, the study does not allow one to be conclusive about the direction of the relationship between PTSD symptoms with functional and health-related quality of life (i.e., do PTSD symptoms lead to worse functioning/quality of life, the opposite, or is something else leading to both?). However, it does allow one to infer that individuals who continue to exhibit PTSD symptoms 2-years after an injury are far more likely to suffer from an overall lower quality of life.

References

Haagsma, J. A., Polinder, S., Olff, M., Toet, H., Bonsel, G. J., & van Beeck, E. F. (2012). Posttraumatic stress symptoms and health-related quality of life: A two year follow up study of injury treated at the emergency department. BMC Psychiatry, 12(1), 1-8.